Game Rules

Texas Holdem

The Game

In its simplest definition, Texas Holdem, or Holdem, is a poker game in which each player receives two cards (hole cards) dealt face down, while five community cards are dealt face up on the table throughout a series of four betting rounds.

Rules

In Texas Holdem poker, the object of the game is to win the pot that players invest in by betting during the various rounds. All players play their best five cards using any combination of their two hole cards and the five community cards on the table. The best five-card poker hand among those in contention for the pot wins.

Types of Texas Holdem

As with any poker game, there are a few variations that differ, based on their betting structures. In Texas Holdem, those three are:

No Limit: Players may bet all of their chips at any time.
Pot Limit: Players may bet an amount equal to the pot size.
Limit: Players may bet a fixed amount for each round.

How to Play Texas Holdem

Below, you'll learn the basics of playing Texas Holdem online, within your home or in a brick & mortar poker room or casino.

The Button

In Texas Holdem, a disc known as the dealer "button" serves to recognize which player sitting at the table is the dealer for that particular hand. The cards are dealt in a clockwise direction from the dealer button. Each time the cards are dealt, a new betting round begins. A Texas Holdem hand starts when the first card is dealt and ends when a winner is declared. After each hand has been completed, as with standard poker rules, the "button" moves clockwise to the next active player. This is done because there is an advantage to having to act last and therefore each player will get his fair share of early, late and middle positions. This player will be considered to be "playing the button" for that hand.

Blinds

The player to the immediate left of the button is first to receive a card and is required to post a "small blind". The small blind is equal to half the lower limit bet rounded down to the nearest whole number (For example, in a 4/8 game, the small blind is 4; in a 3/6 game, the small blind is 3. The player to the immediate left of the small blind is required to post the "big blind", equal to the lower limit bet (For example, in a 3/6 game, the big blind is 6.). When a new player sits down at a Texas Holdem poker game, they must either post the equivalent of the big blind or wait for their turn in the big blind. This prevents players from gaining an advantage by avoiding the blinds and jumping in and out of games. If you have missed one or both blinds, our software will prompt you to put in the correct amount. You can also wait for the blind to get to your position. This is called coming in on the blind. Both blinds in Texas Holdem poker are considered live bets and therefore, according to poker rules, have the option of checking, calling, raising or folding when the betting action returns to their position.

Betting Rounds

First Round (Pre-Flop) - After the Texas Holdem players in the blind positions put their blinds into the pot the dealer deals two cards called "hole cards" to each player. At this time each player can see his own cards but not those of his opponents. After seeing their hole cards, players now have the option to play their hands by calling, raising or folding. On the first round only, a player cannot check (make no bet) and still retain his hand. On the first round only, the betting starts with the first active player to the immediate left of the big blind. The minimum bet in this round is the size of the big blind. Thus in a 5/10 No Limit Texas Holdem game, it would cost a minimum of 10 for the player who acts first to call in this initial round of betting. (The maximum dollar value and number of raises per round depends on version of Texas Hold'em being played as described below.)
Second Round (Flop) - Next, three cards are dealt face-up on the board also known as the "flop". These three community cards are available to all active players. In this round play begins with the first active player to the immediate left (clockwise) of the dealer button, who has one of three choices, check, bet, or fold. Until there is a bet, each succeeding active player has the same choices. Once a bet is made, each succeeding Texas Holdem player then has, in turn, one of three choices; call, raise, or fold. Bets and raises occur in lower limit bet increments. Therefore in a 5/10 No Limit Texas Hold'em game the bet would cost a minimum of 5.
Third Round (Turn) - When betting action is completed for the flop round, the "turn" is dealt face-up on the board. The turn is the fourth community card in a Texas Hold'em poker game. Play once again begins with the active player immediately left (clockwise) of the dealer button and the same rules apply as the second round except that poker betting doubles from the lower limit bet to the higher limit bet. In a 5/10 game, betting on the turn is done in 10 increments.
Fourth Round (River) - When betting action is completed for the turn round, the "river" is dealt face-up on the board. The river is the fifth and final community card in a Texas Hold'em game. Play once again begins with the active player immediately left (clockwise) of the dealer button as explained above.
Showdown - When all the betting is done, and if more than one player is still in for the pot, then the showdown determines who wins the game of Texas Holdem. In No Limit Texas Holdem, it is possible that one or more betting rounds not take place if only one active player has any chips left with all other active players having bet all their chips (all-in). When this occurs, any remaining community cards will be dealt face up and a showdown will take place. The last player to open with a bet or raise is required to show their cards first and anyone else can fold. Players who elect to fold do not have to show their cards. (i.e. muck his cards if he decides he has lost. However the hole cards of all players who stay in to the showdown are included in the hand history, even if they choose to muck). The player with the best five-card hand wins the pot. In the event of identical hands, the pot will be equally divided between the players with the best hands. Texas Hold'em rules state that all suits are equal, so split pots are more common than in other variations of poker.

Betting Structure

No Limit Texas Holdem

In No Limit Texas Holdem, the minimum amount a player can bet must be equal or greater than the big blind and a raise must equal or be greater then the last bet or raise within the same round. There is no maximum amount to bet, a player may bet his entire stack at any time. The number of raises is only limited to a player's chips total.

Pot Limit Texas Holdem

In Pot Limit Texas Holdem, the minimum amount a player can raise must equal or be greater than the last bet or raise within the same round. The maximum a player may bet is equal to the amount in the pot including his call before making the raise. (Example; a player's call is 5 and the pot is 20, he may raise to a maximum of 50. His call of 5 brings the pot to 25 and he may raise the amount equal to the pot of 25, thus the raise is 25.)

Limit Texas Holdem

In Limit Texas Holdem, players must bet a pre-determined fixed amount per each round. The betting amount is equal to the big blind for the first two rounds of betting and doubles up for the last two rounds of betting. A maximum of 4 bets is allowed per round which includes a bet and three raises. (Example; in a 5/10 Limit Texas Hold'em game, players must bet 5 and raise by 5 up to a maximum of 20 for the pre-flop and flop rounds, they must bet 10 and raise by 10 up to a maximum of 40 for the turn and river round).

Omaha

The Game

As with Texas Holdem, Omaha is a game during which players use community cards to create a hand. In Omaha however, players are dealt four cards (hole cards) dealt face down, while five community cards are dealt face up on the table throughout a series of four betting rounds.

Rules

Again, as with Texas Holdem, the object is to win the pot that players invest in by betting during the various rounds but with two major differences. In Omaha, players create their best poker hand by using two of their four hole cards, combined with three community cards. The best five-card poker hand among those in contention for the pot wins.

Types of Omaha

There are three different types of Omaha Poker games, made different by their betting structures

No Limit: Players may bet all of their chips at any time.
Pot Limit: Players may bet an amount equal to the pot size.
Limit: Players may bet a fixed amount for each round.

How to play Omaha

The Button

In Omaha, a disc known as the dealer "button" serves to recognize which player sitting at the table is the dealer for that particular hand. The cards are dealt in a clockwise direction from the dealer button. Each time the cards are dealt, a new betting round begins. An Omaha hand starts when the first card is dealt and ends when a winner is declared. After each hand has been completed, as with standard poker rules, the "button" moves clockwise to the next active player. This is done because there is an advantage to having to act last and therefore each player will get his fair share of early, late and middle positions. This player will be considered to be "playing the button" for that hand.

Blinds

The player to the immediate left of the button is first to receive a card and is required to post a small blind. The small blind is equal to half the lower limit bet rounded down to the nearest dollar (For example, in a 4/8 game, the small blind is 4; in a 3/6 game, the small blind is 3. The player to the immediate left of the small blind is required to post the big blind, equal to the lower limit bet (For example, in a 3/6 game, the big blind is 6.). When a new player sits down at an Omaha poker game, they must either post the equivalent of the big blind or wait for their turn in the big blind. This prevents Omaha players from gaining an advantage by avoiding the blinds and jumping in and out of games. If you have missed one or both blinds, our software will prompt you to put in the correct amount. You can also wait for the blind to get to your position. This is called coming in on the blind. Both blinds in Omaha poker are considered live bets and therefore, according to poker rules, have the option of checking, calling, raising or folding when the betting action returns to their position.

Betting Rounds

First Round (Pre-Flop) - After the Omaha players in the blind positions put their blinds into the pot the dealer deals four cards called "hole cards" to each player. At this time each player can see his own cards but not those of his opponents. After seeing their hole cards, players now have the option to play their hands by calling, raising or folding. On the first round only, a player cannot check (make no bet) and still retain his hand. On the first round only, the betting starts with the first active player to the immediate left of the big blind. The minimum bet in this round is the size of the big blind. Thus in a 5/10 Limit Omaha game, it would cost a minimum of 10 for the player who acts first to call in this initial round of betting. (The maximum dollar value and number of raises per round depends on version of Omaha being played as described below.)
Second Round (Flop) - Next, three cards are dealt face-up on the board also known as the "flop". These three community cards are available to all active players. In this round play begins with the first active player to the immediate left (clockwise) of the dealer button, who has one of three choices, check, bet, or fold. Until there is a bet, each succeeding active player has, in turn, one of three choices; call, raise, or fold. Bets and raises occur in lower limit bet increments. Therefore in a 5/10 Omaha game the bet would cost a minimum of 5.
Third Round (Turn) - When betting action is completed for the flop round, the "turn" is dealt face-up on the board. The turn is the fourth community card in an Omaha poker game. Play once again begins with the active player immediately left (clockwise) of the dealer button and the same rules apply as the second round except that poker betting doubles from the lower limit bet to the higher limit bet. In a 5/10 game, betting on the turn is done in 10 increments.
Fourth Round (River) - When betting action is completed for the turn round, the "river" is dealt face-up on the board. The river is the fifth and final community card in an Omaha game. Play once again begins with the active player immediately left (clockwise) of the dealer button as explained above.
Showdown - When all the betting is done, and if more than one player is still in for the pot, then the showdown determines who wins the game of Omaha. In Omaha, it is possible that one or more betting rounds not take place if only one active player has any chips left with all other active players having bet all their chips (all-in). When this occurs, any remaining community cards will be dealt face up and a showdown will take place. The last player to open or raise is required to show their cards first and anyone else can fold (muck his cards if he decides he has lost. Players who elect to fold do not have to show their cards. (i.e. muck his cards if he decides he has lost. However the hole cards of all players who stay in to the showdown are included in the hand history, even if they choose to muck).The player with the best five-card hand wins the pot. In Omaha poker, players must use two of their four hole cards in combination with three of the cards from the board. In the event of identical hands, the pot will be equally divided between the players with the best hands. Omaha rules state that all suits are equal, so split pots are more common than in other variations of poker.

Betting Structure

Limit Omaha

In Limit Omaha, players must bet a pre-determined fixed amount per each round. The betting amount is equal to the big blind for the first two rounds of betting and doubles up for the last two rounds of betting. A maximum of 4 bets is allowed per round which includes a bet and three raises. (Example; in a 5/10 Limit Omaha game, players must bet 5 and raise by 5 up to a maximum of 20 for the pre-flop and flop rounds, they must bet 10 and raise by 10 up to a maximum of 40 for the turn and river round).

Pot Limit Omaha

In Pot Limit Omaha, the minimum amount a player can raise must equal or be greater than the last bet or raise within the same round. The maximum a player may bet is equal to the amount in the pot including his call before making the raise. (Example; a player's call is 5 and the pot is 20, he may raise to a maximum of 50. His call of 5 brings the pot to 25 and he may raise the amount equal to the pot of 25, thus the raise is 25.)

No Limit Omaha Hi-Lo

In No Limit Omaha, the minimum amount a player can bet must be equal or greater than the big blind and a raise must equal or be greater then the last bet or raise within the same round. There is no maximum amount to bet, a player may bet his entire stack at any time. The number of raises is only limited to a player's chips total.

Omaha Hi-Lo

The Game

Omaha Hi-Lo (short for high & low) is a very entertaining game to play and can generate some truly sizeable pots because of the number of drawing possibilities.

Rules

Again, as with Omaha, the object is to win the pot that players invest in by betting during the various rounds. In Omaha Hi-Lo, players create their best poker hand by using two of their four hole cards, combined with three community cards. The best five-card poker hand among those in contention for the pot wins. The difference between Omaha and Omaha Hi-Lo is that the pot may be shared between a player holding the high (Hi) hand and a player holding the qualifying low (Lo) hand. 

Hi-Lo Explanation

A low hand must have a high card "8 or better" to qualify to be the low hand. That is, to be eligible to win the low, the highest card must be an 8 or lower. Upon a tie with the high card, the hand goes to the player with the next lowest high card. Any hand that is high card 9 or higher cannot qualify as a low hand. In Omaha Hi-Lo the same player can also win both pots for the Hi & Lo hand when there is no qualifying low hand. The straight ace to five is the best possible low hand with the straight four to eight being the worse possible qualifying low hand. The ace can be used as a high and low card in Omaha Hi-Lo. Straights and flushes are not considered when evaluating a low hand.

Types of Omaha Hi-Lo

As with Omaha and Texas Holdem, there are three betting variations that can be played out in ring or tournament game play.

No Limit: Players may bet all of their chips at any time.
Pot Limit: Players may bet an amount equal to the pot size.
Limit: Players may bet a fixed amount for each round.

How to play Omaha Hi-Lo

The Button

In Omaha Hi-Lo, a disc known as the dealer "button" serves to recognize which player sitting at the table is the dealer for that particular hand. The cards are dealt in a clockwise direction from the dealer button. Each time the cards are dealt, a new betting round begins. An Omaha Hi-Lo hand starts when the first card is dealt and ends when a winner is declared. After each hand has been completed, as with standard poker rules, the "button" moves clockwise to the next active player. This is done because there is an advantage to having to act last and therefore each player will get his fair share of early, late and middle positions. This player will be considered to be "playing the button" for that hand.

Blinds

The player to the immediate left of the button is first to receive a card and is required to post a small blind. The small blind is equal to half the lower limit bet rounded down to the nearest dollar (For example, in a 4/8 game, the small blind is 4; in a 3/6 game, the small blind is 3. The player to the immediate left of the small blind is required to post the big blind, equal to the lower limit bet (For example, in a 3/6 game, the big blind is 6.). When a new player sits down at an Omaha Hi-Lo poker game, he must either post the equivalent of the big blind or wait for their turn in the big blind. This prevents Omaha Hi-Lo players from gaining an advantage by avoiding the blinds and jumping in and out of games. If you have missed one or both blinds, our software will prompt you to put in the correct amount. You can also wait for the blind to get to your position. This is called coming in on the blind. Both blinds in Omaha Hi-Lo poker are considered live bets and therefore, according to poker rules, have the option of checking, calling, raising or folding when the betting action returns to their position.

Betting Rounds

First Round (Pre-Flop) - After the Omaha Hi-Lo players in the blind positions put their blinds into the pot the dealer deals four cards called "hole cards" to each player. At this time each player can see his own cards but not those of his opponents. After seeing their hole cards, players now have the option to play their hands by calling, raising or folding. On the first round only, a player cannot check (make no bet) and still retain his hand. On the first round only, the betting starts with the first active player to the immediate left of the big blind. As mentioned, the minimum bet is the size of the big blind. The minimum bet in this round is the size of the big blind. Thus in a 5/10 Limit Omaha Hi-Lo game, it would cost a minimum of 10 for the player who acts first to call in this initial round of betting. (The maximum dollar value and number of raises per round depends on version of Omaha being played as described below.)
Second Round (Flop) - Next, three cards are dealt face-up on the board also known as the "flop". These three community cards are available to all active players. In this round play begins with the first active player to the immediate left (clockwise) of the dealer button, who has one of three choices, check, bet, or fold. Until there is a bet, each succeeding active player has, in turn, one of three choices; call, raise, or fold. Bets and raises occur in lower limit bet increments. Therefore in a 5/10 Omaha game the bet would cost a minimum of 5.
Third Round (Turn) - When betting action is completed for the flop round, the "turn" is dealt face-up on the board. The turn is the fourth community card in an Omaha Hi-Lo poker game. Play once again begins with the active player immediately left (clockwise) of the dealer button and the same rules apply as the second round except that poker betting doubles from the lower limit bet to the higher limit bet. In a 5/10 game, betting on the turn is done in 10 increments.
Fourth Round (River) - When betting action is completed for the turn round, the "river" is dealt face-up on the board. The river is the fifth and final community card in an Omaha Hi-Lo game. Play once again begins with the active player immediately left (clockwise) of the dealer button as explained above.
Showdown - When all the betting is done, and if more than one player is still in for the pot, then the showdown determines who wins the game of Omaha Hi-Lo. In Omaha Hi-Lo, it is possible that one or more betting rounds not take place if only one active player has any chips left with all other active players having bet all their chips (all-in). When this occurs, any remaining community cards will be dealt face up and a showdown will take place. The last player to open or raise is required to show their cards first and anyone else can fold (muck his cards if he decides he has lost. Players who elect to fold do not have to show their cards. (i.e. muck his cards if he decides he has lost. However the hole cards of all players who stay in to the showdown are included in the hand history, even if they choose to muck). The player with the best five-card hand wins the pot. At the showdown each player must use exactly two of their four pocket cards and combine them with exactly three boardcards. At the showdown each player can use any two of their pocket cards for their high hand and any two of their pocket cards for their low. In the event of identical hands, the pot will be equally divided between the players with the best hands. Omaha Hi-Lo rules state that all suits are equal, so split pots are more common than in other variations of poker.

Betting Structures

Limit Omaha Hi-Lo

In Limit Omaha Hi-Lo, players must bet a pre-determined fixed amount per each round. The betting amount is equal to the big blind for the first two rounds of betting and doubles up for the last two rounds of betting. A maximum of 4 bets is allowed per round which includes a bet and three raises. (Example; in a 5/10 Limit Omaha Hi-Lo game, players must bet 5 and raise by 5 up to a maximum of 20 for the pre-flop and flop rounds, they must bet 10 and raise by 10 up to a maximum of 40 for the turn and river round).

Pot Limit Omaha Hi-Lo

In Pot Limit Omaha Hi-Lo, the minimum amount a player can raise must equal or be greater than the last bet or raise within the same round. The maximum a player may bet is equal to the amount in the pot including his call before making the raise. (Example; a player's call is 5 and the pot is 20, he may raise to a maximum of 50. His call of 5 brings the pot to 25 and he may raise the amount equal to the pot of 25, thus the raise is 25.)

No Limit Omaha Hi-Lo

In No Limit Omaha Hi-Lo, the minimum amount a player can bet must be equal or greater than the big blind and a raise must equal or be greater then the last bet or raise within the same round. There is no maximum amount to bet, a player may bet his entire stack at any time. The number of raises is only limited to a player's chips total.

Hand Rankings

Find below the ranking of poker hands starting from the strongest to the weakest.

Royal Flush
An Ace-High straight of one suit

Straight Flush
A straight of entirely one suit.

Four-of-a-Kind
Four cards of the same rank.

Full House
Three cards of the same rank and 2 cards of the same rank.

Flush
Five cards of the same suit but not in sequence.

Straight
Five cards in sequence but not of the same suit.

Three-of–a-Kind
Three cards of the same rank.

Two Pairs
Two cards of the same rank with two other cards of the same rank.

One Pair
Two cards of the same rank.

High Card
When all five cards are not of the same suit, not in sequence and no cards have the same rank.

Tournament Types

One of the key benefits of tournament play is that the monetary risk is much more controlled than in regular cash ring games. Once you buy-in to a tournament, you’re provided with a stack of chips with a goal of attaining every other player’s chips. When one player accumulates all the chips, the tournament is complete. Your time in the game ends however, when your stack is depleted and you bust out.

We offer a variety of tournament formats to choose from:

Multi-table tournament (MTT)

If more than one table is needed to accommodate the number of registered players in a tournament, it is known as a multi-table tournament.

During a Multi-table tournament, as players are eliminated, players will be moved randomly from one table to another in order to keep the number of players at each table as balanced as possible. Although we try to be fair and move players in relation to their position with the dealer button, a player may end up moving from their blinds, to a blind position again.

Sit & Go (SNG)

Sit & Go tournaments are events that do not have a scheduled start time. They start when the needed number of registered players is reached. When the prearranged number of competitors is reached each participant is notified that the tournament is about to start.

Heads-up

When a contest is between 2 players only, it is referred to as Heads-up. The rules are the same with Heads-up play with the exception that the player with the "dealer button" posts the small blind and will act first pre-flop then last for the remainder of the hand. The player who posts the big blind is dealt first.

Re-buy & Add-on

A re-buy & add-on tournament allows for players to re-buy and/or add-on additional chips during the game. These tournaments have a predetermined Re-buy period but generally it is during the first hour of play up until the end of the first break. During the re-buy period, each player is allowed a fixed number or unlimited number of re-buys depending how the tournament has been set up.

A re-buy is permitted during the re-buy period only when a player's chip count is equal to or less than the amount of chips the player had at the start of the tournament. For example, if players were given 1500 chips at the beginning of the tournament they may purchase a re-buy ONLY if their chip count is less than or equal to 1500 chips. This means that if a player loses all of their chips in any hand during the re-buy period they can remain active in the tournament by purchasing a Re-buy of additional chips.

The cost of a re-buy and the number of chips provided is generally the same as the cost of the original buy-in and number of chips provided when the tournament begins. Check the tournament information for details.

A double re-buy allows players to purchase two re-buys in a single transaction, providing players with twice the number of chips as a single re-buy, at twice the cost. For example, if a single Re-buy costs 5 and provides players 1500 chips a double re-buy will cost 10 and provide players 3000 chips. The option to purchase a double re-buy will only be offered to a player when their chip count is zero.

An add-on will be available during the first five minute break of a re-buy & add-on tournament. All players that are still active in the tournament will have the option to purchase an add-on of additional chips regardless of how many chips they have at the time. The cost of an add-on is generally the same as the cost of the original buy-in. The number of chips provided with an add-on is the same or slightly more than the original buy-in.

Re-buys and add-ons can be purchased by clicking on their respective buttons located at the Dealer chip tray or by clicking on the Dealer chip tray itself and then clicking the 'Add Chips' button. There is no additional fee paid by the player when re-buys and add-ons are purchased which means that all Re-buys and Add-ons are added to the tournament prize pool. The total prize pool and the payout structure will not be finalized until both the re-buy and add-on periods have closed.

Freeze-out

In a freeze-out tournament players make a single buy-in and upon losing all their chips, are eliminated from the tournament. As players are eliminated, tables are combined with other tables until there is a final table and ultimately, one player left with all the chips.

Shoot-out

A shoot-out tournament consists of a limited number of players competing on different tables. In round 1, players compete until there is one player left at each table with all the chips. In round 2 the winners from round 1 are then combined at other tables and they again play until there is one player left with all the chips. A Shoot-out tournament can have between two (Heads-up) to ten players on each table competing over 1 or more rounds. The number of rounds and players per table varies and can be found in the tournament lobby.

Bounty

Following the multi table tournament format, Bounty events offer players the chance to recoup their buy-in and win cash, even if they don’t place in the money. When buying in to a Bounty tournament, a pre designated percentage of the tournament buy-in in placed on each player’s head as a bounty - players will receive an instant cash win for every player they bust out of the tournament.

Satellites

Satellite tournaments are events in which the prize is an entry to a larger tournament (with a greater buy-in amount). Many players earn a seat via satellites to our larger buy-in events.

Satellites can play out in a variety of formats including multi table, shoot out or as a sit & go. Registration is identical however the difference comes in the manner by which the prize pool is paid out. For example, if you are joining a satellite to a 100 buy-in tournament then one seat will be awarded for every 100 in the prize pool (or the buy-in of the event the satellite feeds). As registration and the prize pool grows, so are the number of seats to be awarded likely grow. Any leftover prize pool money that cannot quite make it to the value of a whole seat is paid out as cash prizes. The number of cash prizes awarded after seats are allotted will depend on the particular tournament – so players are asked to check the Tournament Lobby for full details.

Satellites to Offline Events

These are special events where we offer players the opportunity to take their game offline and in to the realm of brick & mortar casinos. Satellites to live events run in the same manner as regular satellites, only the 'seats' awarded are prize packages to live events.

Freeroll

These are tournaments that require no buy-in or registration fees, no risks or conditions. Freerolls are our way of giving back to our players.

Tournament Rules

Tournament seats are available on a first come first served basis.

Seating within all single and multi table tournaments is random. Players cannot change seats during a tournament. A player will change seat only when moved from a table to another table during a multi-table tournament.

The player situated in Seat 1 is the designated 'Dealer' for the start of the tournament.

If more than one player is eliminated in a hand, the player with more chips at the beginning of the hand is placed higher. In an instance where 2 or more players are eliminated, and they started the hand with an identical chip count, the player closest to the left of the Dealer Button will be eliminated first, then the player closest to the left of that player, and so on, clockwise around the table.

If there is a split pot, not equally divisible by the number of players in the hand, the chips will first be divided evenly between the winners, then any extra chip(s) will be awarded to he player(s) closest to the left of the Dealer Button.

We use the "Dead Button Rule" in Texas Hold'em and Omaha tournaments. The Dead Button Rule works as follows: when the small blind or big blind player is eliminated, the blinds are re-positioned in order to account for the eliminated player. This ensures fairness to all players, by ensuring that everyone at the table posts appropriate blinds so that no player gains an unfair advantage when another payer is eliminated. When two players remain (or in a Heads-up tournament) the button will post the small blind and act first on the opening round.

Poker is a game of integrity and etiquette. Each player should play with the same intensity against all other players. Unethical play, such as soft-play and chip dumping, may result in penalties, including seizure of funds from the offender's account and/or forfeiture of any prizes and/or termination of the account.

Management reserves the right to cancel or reschedule tournaments at any time, for any reason, with or without notice.

Tournament registration must meet minimum requirements for that event or the tournament will be cancelled. In the event of a tournament cancellation, due to an insufficient number of entrants, all buy-ins and entry fees will be returned to player's accounts.

In the final stages of a tournament, the prize money can jump significantly with each player eliminated. In these instances, where there is more than one table remaining, the tournament may be played "hand-for-hand". This means that if one table finishes its hand before the other table(s), that table waits for the other table(s) to finish before the next hand is dealt. During this hand-for-hand period, all bust outs during a "synchronized" hand (even at different tables) are treated as having happened on the same hand and chip stacks will be compared as in rule 7 above to determine the finishing order.

Extra Time

Each player is allotted a Time Bank during tournament play, to allow for decision making. Such extra time is limited and is displayed as a clock when activated. It decreases as it is being used and stops once a player acts. Extra time will automatically be activated if a player has an active connection to the game, has money in the pot and does not act in time.

The amount of extra time provided varies for each tournament. Each tournament's specific extra time bank will be displayed in the Tournament Information screen, via the Tournament Lobby.

Break Schedules

There will be a 5 minute break every hour in a standard multi-table tournament. There are no breaks during single-table tournaments.
Deals

We do not assist in any deals among players during tournaments. Tournaments will continue until there is one declared winner, unless it is a satellite event, and the payoffs will be exactly according to the prize payout structure.

Registration

Late Registration: Some tournaments will allow players to register after the tournament has started playing. Registration will terminate if the max number of players allowed for the tourney is reached,

Or 15 minutes after the start of a freezeout tourney
Or After the first break of an R&A tourney
Or After the first prize has been awarded

Unregistration

In most tournaments a player can unregister until ten minutes prior to the start of the event. Players who have won their seats through a satellite can unregister when the tournament is in "Registering" state and will be credited with a Ticket. The Tournament Ticket will appear under the Player's 'My Tournaments' and is available for use for the same tournament, at another scheduled time.

Server Issues

In the event of a server crash, all hands in progress will be rolled back. Each player's chip count will be reset to the amount at the beginning of the hand.
If we experience a server crash or unscheduled downtime of less than 20 minutes we will attempt to restart tournaments as soon as the majority of players have reconnected. If the downtime lasts longer than 20 minutes we reserve the right to cancel tournaments and refund players based on our tournament cancelation policy.
Management decisions are final.

Tournament Cancellation Policy

In the unlikely event that a scheduled tournament has to be cancelled we will make all possible efforts to refund players as fairly as possible. Due to the varied scenarios that may be involved we have decided to simplify our policy to cover the three most likely scenarios:

Cancellation prior to the start of a tournament

If a tournament is cancelled prior to starting, all players will receive a refund of their full tournament registration fees. Tournament fees will be refunded in the exact manner that they were paid. (This may include any combination of cash or Gold Chips).

50/50 Tournament Policy

If a tournament is cancelled before the money, we will try to compensate all remaining players based on their play up to the time of the cancellation. This is best achieved by awarding 50% of the prize pool to all remaining players and the other 50% of the prize pool will be awarded proportionately based on each player's chip count. All remaining players will also receive a refund of their entry fee. Any player who was eliminated prior to the cancelation will not be entitled to a refund. All awards for a tournament canceled in progress will be cash. If the cancelled tournament has a guaranteed prize pool, only the entry fee will be returned (not the guaranteed prize).

In the Money Tournament Policy

If a tournament is canceled and there are players in the money, we will try to compensate all remaining players based on their play up to the time of the cancellation. This is best achieved by awarding each remaining player with the minimum prize not yet awarded, and the rest of the prize pool will be awarded proportionately based on each players chip count. All remaining players will also receive a refund of their entry fee. Any player who was eliminated prior to the cancellation will not be entitled to a refund. All awards for a tournament cancelled in progress will be cash. If the cancelled tournament has a guaranteed prize pool, only the entry fee will be returned (not the guaranteed prize).

Disconnection Policy

Should you become disconnected and fail to respond to your table’s action with 25 seconds, when it’s your turn to act in ANY real money or tournament game, your hand will be folded to ANY BET (this will cause you to check if the action is checked to you, or fold if there is action to you).

In a multi-table poker tournament, you'll be given more time to reconnect. When your 25 seconds expires, an automatic 60 second ‘Extra Time Bank’ will launch if you have money in the pot. At expiry of time in the Extra Time Bank, you will FOLD, except in the case of the final table at which players will be given up to 240 seconds to re-establish connection prior to being folded.

You will continue to post and fold until you are re-connected or eliminated from the tournament (whichever comes first).
Management assume no liability if you are disconnected, for any reason, from the game during a hand.